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The Forward Vacation Follies

August 22, 1934


 

From the Forward, August 23, 1934.

THE "VACATION FOLLIES" WAS A SPLENDID SUCCESS; THE THEATRE WAS OVERFLOWING; THE AUDIENCE REACTED TO SKETCHES AND PLAYERS WITH OVATIONS

The nocturnal production in the Second Avenue Theatre, the "Vacation Follies," was a remarkable demonstration of Yiddish theatre, by Yiddish actors, and a joy for everyone who loves to see actors step onto a stage.

By the afternoon all the tickets were sold out. At 7:30 in the evening, police had been sent from the police station in order to restrain the large number of the public who did not want to leave the "lobby."

Inside the theatre they saw a scene that one rarely sees in a theatre. They were standing eight deep; they were seated on the steps by the balustrade. The boxes were so overfilled. My heart was pounding, just looking at them -- this is how it was behind the scenes. Despite the fact that special guards were stationed near the entrances to allow people to enter, many were trapped behind the scenes, and there was no less crowding there than in the orchestra and in the balconies.

Praise be to the firefighters who helped keep order in the theatre, as well as to the ushers, who had the not-so-easy "job" to seat and "pay close attention" to the audience of more than two-thousand people. There was an excellent order in the theatre. The audience in the theatre was a select "Follies" audience, an audience that loves and understands theatre.

At twelve minutes after eight, the "master-of-ceremonies" of the "Vacation Follies," B. Vladeck, opened the program. He said only a few words, and the tone of the evening was set. Vladeck thanked all the unions -- the actors, the musicians, the choristers, the doormen, the ushers, the dressers -- as they participated for free in the production. He also thanked the manager M. Saks for allowing the use of  his large theatre for free, as well as the costume designer for providing clothes. Also congratulations went to the "stagehands," who didn't count "overtime" and generally worked together with the director Izidor Casher.

Casher especially thanked B. Vladeck. In three weeks' time he had worked tirelessly on the production and directed all the "sketches," besides the "Yoshe Kalb" sketch, which Jacob Kalich performed in.

The "Vacation Follies" was a success, both materially and morally. And for all, the audience left from the theatre highly satisfied.

 



 

 

 

 

 

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